Streptomyces from insect microbiome as a source of new antimicrobials

A paper was recently published in Nature Communications (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-08438-0" rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-08438-0) show the results of the discovery of potentially new antibiotics from Streptomyces living in insects. With antibiotic resistance as a major global crisis and very few new antibiotics coming to market, this is an important discovery. Streptomyces isolated from insects inhibited antimicrobial-resistant pathogens more than isolates from soil and can be the source of new promising antibiotics. They are especially effective against gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Cyphomycin is an example of new chemistry from this innovative source. This new source for antimicrobial compounds can invigorate the stagnant antimicrobial pipeline. The new compound has low toxicity to animals.
The antimicrobial potential of Streptomyces from insect microbiomes

Host microbiomes are feasible sources for drug discovery. Here, using large-scale isolations, bioactivity assays and omics, the authors uncover the antimicrobial potential of insect-associated Streptomyces and identify a compound, cyphomycin, active against multidrug-resistant fungal pathogens.

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