Infection outbreaks could be reduced by copper-coated uniforms

A new durable and washable composite material made from antibacterial copper nanoparticles have been developed by material scientists at The University of Manchester, working in collaboration with universities in China. They developed the composite material into wearable materials such as cotton and polyester, which has proved a stumbling block for scientists in the past. The researchers had tethered copper nanoparticles to cotton and polyester using a polymer brush, creating a strong chemical bond. Lead author, Dr. Xuqing Liu, from the School of Materials, said: “Now that our composite materials present excellent antibacterial properties and durability, it has huge potential for modern medical and healthcare applications.” Can the food industry use a similar technology to reduce the spread of bacteria in manufacturing plants? @ http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/infection-outbreaks-at-hospitals-could-be-reduced-by-copper-coated-uniforms/" rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/infection-outbreaks-at-hospitals-could-be-reduced-by-copper-coated-uniforms/
Infection outbreaks at hospitals could be reduced by copper-coated uniforms

Doctors, nurses and healthcare professionals could soon be wearing uniforms brushed with tiny copper nanoparticles to reduce the spread of bacterial infections and viruses, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli), at hospitals.

Material scientists at The University of Manchester, working in collaboration with universities in China, have created a …

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