Improved Mathematical Model for Thermal Resistance- The Effect of Temperature and Fat

Researchers from USDA's Agricultural Research Service and China's Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University published an online article entitled “Improved estimation of thermal resistance of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes in meat and poultry – The effect of temperature and fat and A global analysis” by Lihan Huang, Cheng-An Hwang, and Ting Fang, published in Food Control Vol 96, Feb 2019.29-38. They report on the development of a more accurate regression analysis was developed for the combined effect of temperature and fat on the thermal resistance of the most common food pathogens (E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and L. monocytogenes). Investigators focused on the combined effect of temperature and fat on thermal resistance of pathogens. A reduced model (temperature only, or D-z model) and an expanded model (temperature and fat) were developed by linear regression. The expanded models developed improved the accuracy of estimation of log D. For E. coli O157:H7 in beef, > 93 percent of the variations in log D were attributed to the expanded model developed, > 96 percent for E. coli O157:H7 in non-beef meats and L. monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. in poultry meats. For Salmonella spp. in non-poultry meats, the expended model accounted for 90.4 percent of the variations. This is significantly greater than 74 percent in the reduced model. @ https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S095671351830433X" rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S095671351830433X#!
Improved estimation of thermal resistance of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes in meat and poultry – The effect of temperature and fat and A global analysis

Escherichia coli O157: H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes are three major foodborne pathogens in meats that frequently cause serious huma…

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