FDA Investigating Six Horse Deaths Due to Contaminated Feed from Gilman Co-Op Creamery

The FDA is investigating horse feed from Gilman Co-Op Creamery in Gilman, MN that contained monensin, an animal drug highly toxic to horses, even at low levels. To date, six horses from the same owner have died after eating a single batch of feed. The feed was a special order for the farm and not distributed to other farms. When inspecting the firm, the FDA found that on the date the batch of horse feed in question was manufactured, Gilman Co-Op Creamery first mixed cattle feed containing monensin, and then did not perform adequate cleanout to remove the monensin from its equipment before mixing the horse feed. On June 9, a horse farm in Minnesota began feeding its horses feed mixed by Gilman Co-Op Creamery of Gilman, MN. That evening, one horse became ill and was not able to stand. Two days later, the horse had to be euthanized. On June 12, the owner found two additional horses that were laying down in the pasture that were unable to stand. One horse died that day and the other horse was found dead in the pasture the next day, June 13. Over the course of the next month, three more horses died. In total, six horses died after eating the feed containing monensin. @ https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/NewsEvents/ucm614978.htm?utm_campaign=7-27-2018-monensin&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua" rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/NewsEvents/ucm614978.htm?utm_campaign=7-27-2018-monensin&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua
FDA Investigating Six Horse Deaths Due to Contaminated Feed from Gilman Co-Op Creamery

The FDA is investigating horse feed from Gilman Co-Op Creamery in Gilman, MN that contained monensin, an animal drug highly toxic to horses, even at low levels. To date, six horses from the same owner have died after eating a single batch of feed.

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