Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs bringing new hope for antibiotic resistance

In a study published in Frontiers in Microbiology researchers analyzing soil from Ireland have discovered that it contains a previously unknown strain of bacteria, Streptomyces sp. Myrophore. This organism inhibited the growth of 4/6 of superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, including MRSA. The soil analyzed originated from an area of Fermanagh, Northern Ireland, which is known as the Boho Highlands. It is an area of alkaline grassland and the soil is reputed to have healing properties. It is not yet clear which component of the new strain prevents the growth of the pathogens. The discovery of antimicrobial substances from Streptomyces sp.myrophorea might help in the search for new drugs to treat multi-resistant bacteria. @ https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-12/su-bfi122718.php" rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-12/su-bfi122718.php
Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs -- new hope for tackling antibiotic resistance

Researchers analyzing soil from Ireland long thought to have medicinal properties have discovered that it contains a previously unknown strain of bacteria which is effective against four of the top six superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, including MRSA.

Antibiotic-resistant superbugs could kill up to 1.3 million people in Europe by 2050, according to recent research.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) describes the problem as ‘one of the biggest threats to global health, food security, and development today.’

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